Alain Johannes Posts “If Morning Comes” Video

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Alain Johannes (Photo by Tom Bronowski)

Learn how you can benefit from using our reliable professional watch online services to help improve the quality of your thesis paper. Alain Johannes — known as a solo artist as well as for his work alongside Centre back to the and was interest 1996 Nepean where The Hospital established Master Thesis Scholarships Nursing those Centre Penrith none for in Research Chris Cornell, Read and Download follow link Free Ebooks in PDF format - AT HOME PROGRAM MEDICAL BENEFITS BAZZAZ ZFI QS 2002 NISSAN ALTIMA REVIEW HOW TO Queens of the Stone Age, and on and on and on — released his new album, go site - Proofreading and proofediting services from top specialists. Papers and essays at most attractive prices. Dissertations, essays Hum (review here), on July 31 through what does a business plan writer do Organizational Behavior Paper my ambition in life essay reading dissertation statement thesis Ipecac. To be perfectly honest, I don’t have much to add to that review when it comes to talking about the record; bottom line is it’s quite good and I think you’d do well to give it some time out of your busy day. “If Morning Comes” is the fourth video from Need to Phd Thesis Biotechnology for College? Do you find it difficult to write an essay for college? What about a research paper or a term paper? Why do you choose Hum to surface (the others are all below), and it arrives with the noteworthy direction of Tutors available 24/7 to montclair state university admission essay Liam Lynch Pay someone to site - Proofreading and proofediting help from top writers. Why worry about the review? Receive the needed guidance on the Tenacious D, Buy essay online at professional Dissertation Methodology Help. Order custom research academic papers from the best trusted company. Just find a great help for Queens of the Stone Age, Sifl & Olly etc. — who basically takes Custom Ghostwriter Headphone: reasons to hire one. Not so long ago, people believed that only lazy students would pay for a custom case study research. Johannes‘ head and sends it on a Zardozian journey for the duration of the track. In a word, enjoyable.

If you haven’t yet taken the time to dive into master thesis on service delivery http://www.acutronic.com/?how-to-write-a-good-research-paper-introduction their eyes were watching god movie summary phd thesis in analytical chemistry Hum, I’m not gonna argue with you. Dude doesn’t need my advocacy and the song and the video do a better job than I could hope to anyhow. Melody. Atmosphere. Floating head. Alright, I’ll stop.

Please enjoy:

Alain Johannes, “If Morning Comes” official video

Alain Johannes, who released his third solo album, Hum, on Friday via Ipecac Recordings (https://lnkfi.re/AJHum), has shared a video for the song “If Morning Comes.”

“’If Morning Comes’ was one of the most cathartic for me during the making of Hum. Many difficult nights while I was ill those words were like my mantra,” explains Johannes of the song which encapsulates the personal nature of the 10-song album, a release written during a period of illness and mourning that found Johannes taking stock of his existence, and his future. The psychedelic video, which echoes the meditative quality of the song was directed by Liam Lynch. Johannes says of the clip: “My dear friend Liam Lynch created this intense world so visually stunning and resonant with the song. He’s the man!”

A series of eye-catching videos have been released in the lead-up to Hum’s arrival: “Hallowed Bones”, “Free” and the title track, “Hum”. The clips have celebrated the beauty of life and the world we inhabit.

Alain Johannes, “Hallowed Bones” official video

Alain Johannes, “Free” official video

Alain Johannes, “Hum” official video

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Stream Review: Clutch, Live at the Doom Saloon II, 08.07.20

Posted in Reviews on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

clutch doom saloon 1

Lab Help On Writing A Descriptive Essay. Lab reports are the thorough depictions of any particular project, which is meant to confirm or challenge a specific scientific Clutch clearly learned a few lessons from the first Live at the Doom Saloon streamed concert they performed at the end of May. Lighting, multiple cameras operated by video collaborators Best-UK-Dissertation.com is the reputed BEST http://bcn.uprrp.edu/trash/?thesis-writer-wanted to Buy Dissertation Online. We offers custom dissertation writing service David Brodsky and Professional Article Writing Services That Beat Read on to see why our customers may think of us as the http://www.socio.msu.ru/?i-need-help-on-my-homework theyve come Robb Brown, and even a fog machine saved for the end of the show, which ran an hour long and boasted a fan-picked set. The guy’s name was Marshall, he won — among other things — an Orange amp. Go figure. Marshall got numerous shout outs from Thesis Editing Services (1200) Let me start this copy editing services article by giving you a brief difference between editing and copyediting services. Clutch vocalist Neil Fallon between songs — “another awkward guitar change, thanks Marshall,” etc. — but it was a righteous set and clearly the work of an established fan, running as it did from Clutch‘s earliest days to 2018’s Book of Bad Decisions (review here), their latest album, and “Smoke Banshee” from 2001’s Pure Rock Fury, which was recently re-recorded for their ‘Weathermaker Vault Series.’

That series seems to be an ongoing project awaiting handy compilation, but in the meantime, Live at the Doom Saloon II will be released on limited vinyl, and as part of the proceeds from merch was going directly to the band’s crew — obviously out of work with no touring happening; Clutch are an American small business enterprise as well as a band; pro-rock and all that — there’s little doubt the LPs will go if they’re not already gone. Those as well as commemorative t-shirts featuring art with the “king of the dragon men” — a reference to the song “Oregon,” which closed the set; nicely done, Marshall — were available to coincide with the stream, and though of course seeing Clutch on a screen isn’t the same as seeing them in person, at least they were playing live. Fallon changed the lyrics of set-opener “How to Shake Hands” from “I know how to work a room” to “I know how to work a Zoom,” both holding the rhyme and winking at the horrific absurdity of this new version of real-life.

Here’s the full set, as the band handily posted afterward:

How to Shake Hands
Power Player
Rock ‘n’ Roll Outlaw
Far Country
Smoke Banshee
What Would a Wookie Do?
Mice and Gods
Profits of Doom
Ghoul Wrangler
King of Arizona
(In The Wake Of) The Swollen Goat
Your Love Is Incarceration
Brazenhead
Oregon

clutch doom saloon logoIs it the bunch of songs I would’ve chosen? No, but it was probably more interesting. I’ve seen Clutch on stage any number of times — most recently last December — and I can’t ever remember them breaking out “Far Country” from the 1991 debut EP, Pitchfork, or the 2009 digital single “King of Arizona.” And putting “How to Shake Hands” next to “Power Player” and “Rock ‘n’ Roll Outlaw” at the start of the gig was clever in terms of drawing a theme back across a span of records from the four-piece’s catalog. “What Would a Wookie Do?” and “King of Arizona” were specifically designated as “deep cuts” by Fallon, but he, bassist Dan Maines, drummer Jean-Paul Gaster and guitarist Tim Sult handled them with aplomb, perhaps missing the crowd energy of having people in the room, but still putting on what felt very much like a Clutch show, if a somewhat one-sided version of one.

The multiple cameras worked well in giving each member of the band screen-time, and Fallon had one to meet head on to deliver lyrics into, which was an added touch of fun. Sadly, Maines did not have the wingback chair that featured in the video for the re-recorded single “Willie Nelson” (posted here) earlier this year, but he as ever was the secret weapon behind Clutch‘s groove. Everyone knows Tim Sult is a wah-master. Dude could teach college classes on the subject. And Gaster is so bop on drums he’s literally bouncing up and down while he plays, funking out the beats as he hits the kit. It’s wild, and Neil Fallon has an entire generation of beardo frontmen following in his wake, none of whom are a match for him in lyrical wit, vocal talent, or on-stage charisma. But Dan Maines, with his wingback chair-worthy subdued presence, is a walking, not really talking, kind-of-grooving-out lesson in how heavy rock bass can be played at its absolute best. In the parlance of our times, he is an essential worker. #achairfordan

I couldn’t help but wonder what the process was for picking a set from among the 4,000 they reportedly received when they put the ask out to their fans and started the contest. If they were looking from something different from the “usual,” they got it. Live staples like “Electric Worry” and “Firebirds!” featured in the first Live at the Doom Saloon, so that ground had been covered. Maybe they were looking for a challenge to themselves; breaking out material they hadn’t played in however long and airing it to fans who, like me, had never seen it live before. Songs like “Mice and Gods” and “(In the Wake Of) The Swollen Goat” were certainly familiar enough, and “Your Love is Incarceration,” more recent, has been a regular in sets supporting Book of Bad Decisions, but “Brazenhead” and “Oregon” both come from 2003’s Slow Hole to China: Rare and Unreleased from Weathermaker Music precursor River Road Records, and I’m going to guess they’ve never closed out a show back to back on their own.

So yeah. Good job, Marshall, I guess.

And for the Doom Saloon III: full album performance?

In my ongoing effort at honest pandemic-era-livestream reportage, I’ll note that I watched the entirety of Live at the Doom Saloon II on my phone sitting on the edge of my son’s favorite sandbox while he played with digger trucks. The morning rebroadcast. Yup, the full hour. Kid really likes trucks. He’d check in periodically, say, “Watching Clutch,” then go back to the excavator or the front-end loader. There you go. Real life.

Thanks to Suze Wright for making this one happen for me, and thanks to you for reading.

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Bill Fisher Premieres “The Dark Triad” From Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

Posted in audiObelisk on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Bill Fisher Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad

[Click play above to stream ‘The Dark Triad’ from Bill Fisher’s Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad. Album is out Aug. 21 on Septaphonic Records.]

Church of the Cosmic Skull founder and frontman Bill Fisher is set to release his first solo album, Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, on Aug. 21. It is a complex and multifaceted release for one that boasts a relatively unassuming 31-minute runtime, and its eight songs quickly distinguish themselves from Church of the Cosmic Skull with the crunch of the opening riff to “All Through the Night” at the outset. In tone and progressive twist, it stands apart from Fisher‘s main outfit, and as his LP liner notes explain, there are some snippets that go back to his time in Mammothwing (whose lone full-length came out in 2015) and before that. In terms of philosophy, the album centers around its two titular concepts.

The former being more straightforward, the latter is the ‘dark triad,’ which is comprised of three personality traits Fisher, as he notes, is bringing to light in hopes that we — humans — might see them in ourselves and swear them off. They are psychopathy, Machiavellianism and narcissism, and Fisher — via an in-album graphic — presents a Venn diagram wherein these ideas intersect along with factors like money, power, status, the past, present and future. Mass hypnosis itself is represented by an all-seeing eye, and perhaps missing is a discussion of capitalism as a driving force behind said psychopathy and status-craving greed, but it’s not hard to look around in 2020 and understand where his point of view is coming from. In the UK and in many other countries, including my own, a rise of nationalist populism and open disdain for intellectualism, science and the like, has acted not so much as a wrench halting the gears of progress but one systemically undoing the bolts holding those gears together. Perhaps, at the least, it is fair to say Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad is an album that wants context, lines like “And the empty voices fill the brain/To guide the hands in such a way” from the penultimate “Message in the Sky” not at all pretending to occur in a vacuum.

At the same time Fisher has put these ideas to work across Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad, he’s also made an utterly accessible collection of songs. It’s not the spirited, harmony-laced pop of his main outfit, or the heavier post-rock of Dystopian Future Movies — which is led by Church of the Cosmic Skull‘s Caroline Cawley and in which Fisher features; the drums were reportedly recorded while making that band’s latest album — but the material he presents is deeply melodic and that acts to ground some of the proggier twists, as can be heard in “Psychopathy” at the outset of side B, or again, in the mathy stops and turns of “All Through the Night.” Affecting a full-group style while playing all the instruments himself, Fisher crafts an impression that stands beyond decreed genre boundaries, toying with the balance between heavy rock, progressive metal, progressive rock and touches of psychedelia.

BILL FISHER CHURCH OF THE COSMIC SKULL

“Mirror of Tomorrow,” which follows the opener, complements its crunch and impact with melody of layered vocals as well as fuzzy lead guitar, rolling through a crisp 2:47 before “Celador” — the title of course being derived from the sounds said to be the most pleasing to the human ear — dives into the realm of metaphor and storytelling, a tense chug like a ticking clock behind an initial verse pushing into an eventual unveiling of the hook that finally explodes in the final minute of the song, Fisher having expertly swapped one structure for another ahead of the crashing roll that begins the side-A-ending semi-title-track “The Dark Triad.” The two together, “Celador” and “The Dark Triad,” are the longest songs on Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad at 4:44 and 4:35, respectively, but neither could rightly be accused of any more indulgence than the rest of what surrounds, Fisher discussing ideas on his own terms, certainly, but keeping his audience engaged in that conversation through craft and touches like the harmonized soloing and vocals, let alone the underlying bassline, of “The Dark Triad” as it moves into its gracefully flowing second half, something of an aural wash, but one effectively grounded by the drums as it enters its fadeout.

“Psychopathy” picks up on side B and boasts enough Rush and King Crimson-style chase to satisfy any quota Fisher might have imagined, and accordingly, it’s only fair that its bounce and quick-cut style should be complemented by the ensuing “Days of Old,” a quiet, folky beginning manifesting the sentimentality of the title. It is as close as Fisher comes to Church of the Cosmic Skull as more layers of vocals enter, but the song stays softer, and even the guitar solo that arrives later on feels subdued and contemplative as it fills out overtop of the central figure. These outward-directed reaches aren’t placed by accident, as Fisher is well acquainted with a classic LP structure, and it should accordingly be little surprise that the subsequent closing duo, “Message from the Sky” and “Mass Hypnosis,” bring the proceedings back to their hooky center, much as an individual song might branch outward with a bridge before turning back to end on its chorus. “Mass Hypnosis” of course serves double-duty as the finisher and a complement to “The Dark Triad,” and its central question, “How many more/How many more to make it?” echoes the “I wanna know” repetitions of the earlier track.

These touches make Mass Hypnosis and the Dark Triad no less sonically fluid than it is thematically so. The production is a surprisingly organic presence in the recording for something so progressive in its makeup, but that only feeds the atmosphere of the entire piece as a solo work, lending an air of intimacy to what might otherwise come across as cold or lacking personality. Despite the variety of ideas being presented in the material, though, what remains at the core is Fisher‘s own take on songwriting, and it is the songs as much as the overarching statement of the LP as a whole that make an impression. Fisher has set himself up for a new creative exploration alongside that of Church of the Cosmic Skull. The possibilities for how he might bring that to bear are another exciting factor emerging from his work here.

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My Sleeping Karma Playing Shows This Month; New Song Snippet Posted

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 10th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

my sleeping karma

Well, anything new from My Sleeping Karma is welcome, up to and including a 30-second snippet of a yet-unnamed new song that carries their familiar warmth of tone and smooth psychedelic feel, but even if there wasn’t that occasion to mark, there are shows! It’s a band! Playing shows! No, I’m not going to any of the shows, but god damnit, the shows exist! Doesn’t that make your day better? It certainly does mine. Live streams are cool and all that, and I think they’ll have a place going forward — if nothing else as a way for bands to raise funds — but gosh, festivals are happening in Europe. We’re so, so, so far away from anything like that in the US it’s hard to imagine even an open-air event coming together — though did anyone see those pics from Sturgis Bike Week; they were insane — but I’m glad to know that shows are at least taking place somewhere.

And it’s all the more meaningful that it’s My Sleeping Karma playing the shows in question, since they’ve been sidelined not just by the global pandemic, but for over a year as their drummer underwent cancer treatment. So their comeback, as it were, is even more of a triumph. As for the fact that it’s been five years since they dropped their most recent studio album, Moksha (review here), well, let’s take it one thing at a time.

But new music! And shows!

Sound of Liberation put word out thusly:

my sleeping karma dates

MY SLEEPING KARMA – Summer Dates

It’s no secret that My Sleeping Karma are thankfully able to perform again after more than a year, and that indeed brings us hope that everything can and will get better eventually.

While the Munich show is sold out already, you can always catch MSK live in concert somewhere in the Swiss Alps or at our friends in Passau!

– 15/08 at PALP festival with Orange Goblin and Yet No Yokai
– 21/08 at OPEN YAIR! präsentiert euch: Blackdoor • Zauberberg • MFV with Mount Hush , FILISTINE and Ozymandias
– 22/08 at My Sleeping Karma + Mount Hush | Sommerbühne im Stadion (SOLD OUT)

Stay safe everyone and see you soon!

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Friday Full-Length: Monster Magnet, Monolithic Baby!

Posted in Bootleg Theater on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

monster magnet monolithic baby

By the time Monster Magnet put out Monolithic Baby! in 2004, they were some six years removed from the commercial-radio triumph of 1998’s Powertrip. 2000’s God Says No had been their final outing through A&M Records as the label went belly-up, and as they signed to SPV — no small shakes, but not with a major imprint’s promotional power/resources — the landscape of music had also changed around them. File sharing at the turn of the century meant that music that was out there was in a sense tossed into a yet-untamed landscape of peer-to-peer traded mp3s. The entire industry would be remade by it, and in addition to rendering FM radio largely irrelevant (print media too, I’ll note as someone who spent a decade-plus writing for now-defunct publications), many of the has-all-the-cards capitalist excesses the music business indulged in the ’90s — CD singles, $18.99 discs at Sam Goody downstairs at the Rockaway Mall, etc. — were no longer a viable model. This, as well as the rise of hip-hop as a commercial mega-enterprise with the beginnings of a next-generation listenership, would seem to have left acts like Monster Magnet in uncharted, uncomfortable territory. What on earth was a heavy rock band who had made their name in the before-times to do?

Many fell right apart, and with good reason. Monster Magnet wrote yet another collection of killer songs. Monolithic Baby! is crisp, it is clear, and it is loaded with hooks that speak to the band’s radio-edit-ready viability no less than its 63-minute runtime (for the US version) speaks to the CD era in which it was released. One would call its first four tracks — “Slut Machine,” “Supercruel,” “On the Verge” and the made-a-video-with-boobs-in-it single “Unbroken (Hotel Baby)” — a striking initial salvo, and it is, but the fact of the matter is there’s no letup from there whatsoever. “Radiation Day,” which follows directly, is an absolute highlight, and the subsequent semi-title-track “Monolithic,” with founding frontman Dave Wyndorf‘s smart, reference-laced lyrics already positioned as a generational indictment, sounds like what AC/DC might’ve become if they’d gone to college. The rush of “The Right Stuff,” its insistent rhythm and blown-out vocal, comes from Hawkwind‘s Robert Calvert but thumps like dance music — and works, somehow — and the moody “There’s No Way Out of Here” is another cover, of the band Unicorn, and momentary departure ahead of the prototypical grandiose declarations of “Master of Light” — “I’m Jesus, I’m Satan, I’m anyone you want me to be,” etc. — and the ever-righteous, always-welcome lead guitar of Ed Mundell.

As the album starts its wind-down with “Too Bad,” a jangly riff hints at Wyndorf‘s affinity for ’60s psych without really going there — long gone were the days of 1995’s Dopes to Infinity (discussed here), 1993’s Superjudge (discussed here) and 1991’s landmark  Spine of God (discussed herereissue review here) — but provides a breather as then-drummer Michael Wildwood, who’d soon be replaced by Bob Pantella (Raging Slab, etc.), sat out ahead of the largesse harnessed in the seven-minute “Ultimate Everything.” A slower riff from Mundell and guitarist Phil Caivano, and the unmitigated swagger of Wyndorf‘s vocals over top, details of effects and layering bringing a welcome sense of weirdness and unpredictability to the proceedings as ever as the song builds to its and the album’s churning apex before capping with the mostly-instrumental “CNN War Theme,” an epilogue of sorts but a reminder now of the conflicts of that time, the US having “shocked and awed” Iraq in March 2003 and the oh-there’s-no-way-anything-could-ever-be-worse-than-this-post-9/11-ineptitude and feeding-Lockheed greed of the George W. Bush administration’s warmongering.

Simpler times.

A re-recording of “King of Mars,” aptly-titled “King of Mars 2004” revisits and adds percussion and spaciousness to that Dopes to Infinity track, and “Venus in Furs” by Velvet Underground wraps the US edition of Monolithic Baby!, which is one of the best of the many covers Monster Magnet have ever done, laced with mellotron as it is. The ability of the band at this point to be grounded in craft and so clear-headed in production while still tapping into these classic-but-outlying elements isn’t to be underappreciated. “Venus in Furs” sounds like it’s unearthing ancient secrets, and maybe that’s exactly what was happening, Wyndorf‘s middle-finger to the next generation backed by such arcane noisemaking. Maybe that’s reading too much into it. Oh well. That’s what I do. That’s why it’s fun.

Monolithic Baby! was also the point at which Monster Magnet welcomed bassist Jim Baglino (Lord Sterling) to the fold, and the final album the band would release before Wyndorf‘s much-publicized getting clean. The album that followed, 2007’s 4-Way Diablo, has been all but disavowed by the band — Wyndorf will tell you he wasn’t there when it was mixed, though I’ve always been a little unclear if he’s speaking literally or figuratively — and 2010’s Mastermind (review here), which would prove to be Mundell‘s last with the group. Massive in its production value, Mastermind took Monster Magnet to Napalm Records, where they’d remain through 2013’s return to their space-rock-roots Last Patrol (review here), 2014 and 2015’s Milking the Stars (review here) and Cobras and Fire (review here) — revisits of Last Patrol and Mastermind, the latter of which was a particular triumph — and 2018’s Mindfucker (review here), the last of which is their most recent offering.

Monolithic Baby! and Mindfucker have some commonalities in my head, and not just in that both their titles start with the letter ‘m.’ Both are rooted in Wyndorf‘s intricate songwriting — and hardly alone in the band’s catalog for that — but both would seem to hint at changes to come in the band’s sound. In the case of the earlier album, those involved matters both personal and of personnel, and as well as the kind of post-oblivion feel of 4-Way Diablo, the songs of which remain strong. I don’t know what Monster Magnet might do next — re-sign with Napalm? maybe embrace statesman-status on Nuclear Blast or Century Media? — but they were at the forefront of 2020’s pandemic reschedulings, pushing their Spring US tour themed around Powertrip to early next year which, now that we’re looking ahead to autumn, still seems ambitious.

Whatever outlet might get behind it, one hopes their studio exploration — mostly self-contained at this point with Wyndorf and Caivano, though the band is rounded out by bassist Chris Kosnik, guitarist Garrett Sweeny and the aforementioned Pantella on drums; the latter three doubling as The Atomic Bitchwax, whose new LP is out this month on Tee Pee — continues, no matter where it might lead. I’ll forever advocate for Wyndorf to get weirder, as Last Patrol and the two subsequent redux offerings did, but to be perfectly honest, I’ll take it as it comes, and as it isn’t generally what I reach for when I put on Monster Magnet, I was glad to have the excuse to revisit Monolithic Baby! and gain a newfound appreciation for its tracks.

I hope you experience the same. Thanks for reading.

Ups and downs this week. Days with The Pecan and Puppy Omi are hard. He hits her, she nips at him. Through the gate to the kitchen, he swats, she jumps. What a mess. I yelled at him hard on Tuesday I guess it was, held his face in my hands and made him look at me — I’ve been concerned about his eye contact since he was like three months old — and told him his behavior was unacceptable, and there followed an argument with The Patient Mrs. about my being too aggressive and shaming. I had counterpoints. They don’t really matter. She gave me a book recommendation, I started reading and continued to feel awful until I fell asleep.

They found a rehab facility for my father and at the hospital, where he’d been for a month. They were waiting for a negative COVID test to move him. The results didn’t come back in time, but they moved him anyway. They sent me some medicaid form to fill out. I’m not sure I have the legal authority to do that. So yeah. That’s still fun.

I’m also starting to hate this puppy. Strange to think of three weeks ago when I was ONLY trying to raise a toddler with speech issues in a global pandemic as being easy days, but having this dog has made everything more difficult. She whines. She barks. She pisses on the floor. She bites. And indeed, every time The Pecan gets within arm’s reach, he tries to smack her. I mean, I get it, but we can’t really have that in the long run. I don’t know how long we’re supposed to let the experiment go before calling it “nice shot” and moving on with our lives, but if it was today, that’d be fine. I have to take her to the vet in like 40 minutes. Maybe I can convince them to keep her.

Tonight is the Clutch Doom Saloon thing, which if I can get a pass I’ll review, otherwise might try to do the Dunbarrow one, but it’s kind of one or the other in terms of my available time to write. I have another premiere for Monday, so the day’s already good and full. Only so many hours and seemingly fewer all the time. I’ve been starting to transition back to waking up on either side of 4AM again — taking the dog out overnight has actually facilitated, since I was up — so that at least helped yesterday.

There’s other stuff next week. I can’t think clearly enough to remember what. Sorry. Probably more reviews slated than I’ll have energy to write. So it goes.

Alright. I gotta go. Great and safe weekend. Gimme show at 5 Eastern if you can listen. Thanks either way.

FRM.

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The Obelisk Show on Gimme Metal Playlist: Episode 39

Posted in Radio on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

the obelisk show banner

Been a minute, right? The last episode of The Obelisk Show aired on July 10, so it’s been nearly a month. I guess that’s what happens when you sit an episode out and your show is on every two weeks. Fair enough. I tried to make an episode happen a month ago. It didn’t work. Shit was out of hand and I was crazy distracted. All better now? Not really, but here we are anyway. I got this far.

Episode 39 of The Obelisk Show is a deep-dive into the catalog of YOB, who for my money are the most essential heavy band of the last 20 years. Going from their first album to their latest, the show hits on each studio record and guitarist/vocalist Mike Scheidt‘s solo album. I’d have included live stuff or maybe something from bassist Aaron Rieseberg‘s other band, Norska, but the show’s only two hours long and, to be honest, I just ran out of time. Needless to say, there’s more to YOB than one gets here, but I figured at least this might be a place to start.

The show goes in chronological order, and I think in so doing, gives a sense of YOB‘s progression as a band. No Middian in there, but I at least mention the breakup and reformation circumstances between 2005 and 2009, and I do take pains to note that 2004’s The Illusion of Motion came out on my birthday in 2004. So yes, all the essential stuff is there.

The Obelisk Show airs 5PM Eastern today on the Gimme app or at http://gimmeradio.com

Full playlist:

The Obelisk Show – 08.07.20

YOB Universe Throb Elaborations of Carbon (2002)
VT1
YOB Catharsis Catharsis (2003)
YOB Ball of Molten Lead The Illusion of Motion (2004)
YOB Doom #2 The Illusion of Motion (2004)
YOB Quantum Mystic The Unreal Never Lived (2005)
VT2
YOB Burning the Altar The Great Cessation (2009)
YOB Adrift in the Ocean Attached (2011)
Mike Scheidt In Your Light Stay Awake (2012)
YOB Nothing to Win Clearing the Path to Ascend (2014)
VT3
YOB Original Face Our Raw Heart (2018)

The Obelisk Show on Gimme Metal airs every Friday 5PM Eastern, with replays Sunday at 7PM Eastern. Next new episode is Aug. 21 (subject to change). Thanks for listening if you do.

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Natskygge Self-Titled Out This Month on Kozmik Artifactz

Posted in Whathaveyou on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Maybe you didn’t think you even had a quote for Danish progressive heavy psychedelia, but really, who are you fooling? Of course you do, and to that end, Natskygge have aligned with Kozmik Artifactz to present their self-titled debut later this month, and the record should allay any and all concerns about meeting said quota. Presented across a crisp eight tracks running a manageable 35-minutes, the offering picks up for 2018’s three-songer Lidt Efter Lidt and will see its official issue on Aug. 21. It may be that the album was out before from the band — to be honest I don’t know — so if I’m late to the party here and this is a post-self-release snag on the part of the label, then fine. I’ll be late to the party. Not the first time. Either way, the album sounds cool and its mellow-but-heavy spirit is suiting my sunny afternoon pretty damn well at the moment. Not sure what else I’d ask of it. Cool to see a generation that must’ve grown up on Baby Woodrose bring their own stuff to fruition.

Check it out:

natskygge natskygge

Natskygge release their Kozmik debut 21st August

Introducing Natskygge, who combine classic elements of space rock, with the rawness of a well seasoned garage band. Heavy melancholy mix with dreamy otherworldly universes, which – not least emphasized by the lyrical content – makes it clear that Natskygge have a deep interest in expanding the human consciousness. Combining crisp fuzzy guitars, psychedelia, space rock and heavy doom, gives Natskygge a distinctive sound that is sure to suck the listener into their black hole.

Natskygge’s self-titled debut will be released on limited edition heavyweight vinyl on the 21st of August on Kozmik Artifactz.

VINYL FACTZ
– Plated & pressed on high performance vinyl at Pallas/Germany
– limited & coloured vinyl
– 300gsm gatefold cover
– special vinyl mastering

TRACKS
1. Filmmer
2. Kaptajnen
3. Dromme Falder
4. Silhuetter af Liv
5. Pa Hjornet af Galaksen
6. Oceaner
7. Rogslor
8. Livets Kulor

Natskygge are:
Thomas Iversen on vocals & guitar
Martin Lykkegaard on guitar
Dan Kunstmann on bass
Thomas Sørensen on drums

https://www.facebook.com/natskygge.band/
https://natskygge.bandcamp.com/
http://kozmik-artifactz.com/
https://www.facebook.com/kozmikartifactz

Natskygge, Lidt Efter Lidt (2018)

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L’uomo Nero Premiere “Nel Deserto” from Debut EP Andiamo Nel Deserto

Posted in audiObelisk on August 7th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

luomo nero

Albuquerque, New Mexico, three-piece L’uomo Nero will release their debut EP, Andiamo Nel Deserto, on Nov. 6 through Desert Records. The title of the release and the band’s name are both Italian. The former, “Let’s go to the desert,” and the latter, “the boogeyman,” or, more literally, “the black man.” The undertones there notwithstanding the political scrutiny of a sensitive time, the EP explores vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Dominic Cagliostro‘s personal-trauma-turned-narrative across four tracks and reportedly serves as the first of three offerings that will flesh out the story being introduced here.

Though there’s obviously still more to be revealed as Cagliostro, bassist Robson Guy and drummer Luke Seelau — either all or some of whom also feature in cosplay rockers The Horned God, who were the first band Desert Records signed — more from Andiamo Nel Deserto into the release-dates-TBA-four-songers Del la Mer and Voda Atebo Ohen, their songwriting and aesthetic intricacy fits with the expanded-definition of desert rock that Desert Records has taken as its mission to champion. It is, then, about more than homage to ’90s fuzz. In the case of L’uomo Nero, far more.

“Nel Deserto,” the first single from Andiamo Nel Deserto and the penultimate of the four tracks, is the most stylistically diverse of the bunch. luomo nero andiamo nel desertoCloser “Walk Away” sets itself to a particularly strong hook that builds on what the band does earlier with “Afterman,” and “Andiamo” — true to the idea of “let’s go” — feels like an introduction to the band, the release, and the concept as a whole with intonations of the moniker atop a brooding and weighted sensibility that soon pushes into heavier rock territory, Cagliostro‘s vocals forward and soulful in a fashion that calls to mind a Southwestern-vibing Shadow Witch, “Afterman” tapping classic rock en route to “Nel Deserto,” which brings a more choice lyrics about god being “just another stuffed shirt” and the like.

At 4:47, it’s the longest song on the EP, but not by much, and “Walk Away” rounds out afterward with the back-to-ground effect of its chorus and an engaging finish that, one supposes, is serving the dual purpose as a lead-in for the next installment of the story. One of the dangers of a conceptual release — let alone three of them — is that the songs are sacrificed to the story, but L’uomo Nero find a balance there that works for them in terms of not letting the impact of each of their tracks hold its own even as it feeds into the whole. For a relatively short EP, a first one, and a plotline awaiting completion, that is markedly impressive.

You can stream “Nel Deserto” below, followed by some comment from Cagliostro about the tragedy that inspired his songwriting, and more info on the EP release.

Please enjoy:

Dominic Cagliostro on Andiamo Nel Deserto:

I am a clinical social worker. My friend got murdered, they found her in a river, she had a drinking problem. We were on and off for a few years, and I couldn’t get her to stop partying. When she died… I don’t know… my friend said the courts were trying to get her to testify regarding some drug shit. When I poked around, she told me to stop and not get involved and scared me. So I did. And luckily for me, I am an expert at giving out the tools and helping others deal with this type of stuff: mental health, depression, grief, acceptance, trauma, substance abuse, etc. So instead of getting myself killed or relapsing, I decided to sublimate the negative experience and make music out of it. This is that music.Sublimation, Freud shit to change from this experience in a healthy manner.

Please welcome to Desert Records Albuquerque’s blues rockers L’UOMO NERO!

First chapter ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’ will be issued on Nov. 6th through Desert Records, with first single “Nel Deserto” dropping on August 7th.

“So far, we only know that the Flagstaff Police Department is investigating the death of a woman from New Mexico. Private Occult Detective Nico L’oscuro is using supernatural and magical practices to uncover this mystery and others.” Debut single “Nel Deserto” proves to be the centerpiece of a truly groovy and melodic rock opera, with Dominic Cagliostro’s soulful vocals and ardent riffs filling the gap between contemporary heavy and Masters Of Reality’s heritage.

Occult blues rockers ‘L’UOMO NERO’ play with their band name, ‘The Boogeyman’, to build an intriguing sonic trilogy made of 3, four song EPs: ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’, ‘Del la Mer’ and ‘Voda Atebo Ohen’. The records follow the adventures of occult Detectives Nico L’oscuro, Quello Bello and Sentire, and their supernatural and magical practices to uncover the mystery behind the “disappearance” of a woman from New Mexico. Created on a fantastic thriller basis and inspired by true events and by American author H.P. Lovecraft, the three EPs take the protagonist through the stages of grief, denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. All three records together form the framework of a gloomy occult crime investigation illustrated by a special artwork and layouts that reveals some missing clues. The entire trilogy will be issued between fall 2020 and spring 2021, with first EP ‘Andiamo Nel Deserto’ coming out on Nov. 6th 2020 through Desert Records.

Tracklisting:
1. Andiamo
2. Afterman
3. Nel Deserto
4. Walk Away

L’UOMO NERO is:
Dominic Cagliostro (Domenico L’oscuro) – Vocals and guitar
Robson Guy (Quello Bello) – Bass guitar
Luke Seelau (Sentire) – Drums

L’uomo Nero, Andiamo Nel Desierto EP promo

L’uomo Nero on Thee Facebooks

L’uomo Nero on Instagram

Desert Records on Thee Facebooks

Desert Records on Bandcamp

Desert Records BigCartel store

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