Days of Rona: Giorgio Trombino of Elevators to the Grateful Sky, Assumption, Sixcircles and Dolore

Posted in Features on June 4th, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

elevators to the grateful sky Giorgio Trombino

Days of Rona: Giorgio Trombino of Elevators to the Grateful Sky, Assumption, Sixcircles and Dolore (Palermo, Italy)

We Write Your Entire Business Plan. Professional Business Plan Consultants. BizPlanEasy How To Write An Application Letter Nigerias. How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

We had scheduled our final pre-album rehearsals when the lockdown kicked in. Everything was already in the pipeline but now all plans have been postponed to who-knows-when. That being said, Assumption has always been a long-distance band since we all live in different places, basically three in Northern Italy and one in Slovenia. I mean, our regular band life is already about getting to meet just for specifically planned occasions, so we know the hassle. We would love to stick together much more than we are allowed to and not just for playing and recording. On a personal level, lockdown was ok and I’ve tried to make most out of it. I even managed to move to a new house with my girlfriend as we had like a special permit to carry the furniture, drive back and forth and so on. I have been reading, watching movies and writing new music the rest of the time.

An Components Literature Review Dissertation is the heartbeat of the television newsroom. Here is a career profile and a job description. How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

Situations differ a lot from region to region. Northern regions like Lombardia and Piemonte are still facing the toughest tasks, whereas both major islands and southern Italy in general have seen slightly better times. Veneto, the region I currently live in, has received much praise and is now regarded as a national model in contagion management in spite of the idiotic and extremely unstable discourses of regional President Luca Zaia. It seems like he basically did all he could to try and dismantle this region’s efficient healthcare system during the last few years but in the end he took all of his staff’s credit for the good results. I mean, what else would you expect from someone whose political party (Lega, formerly Lega Nord) is one of the most arrogant, self-righteous and repulsive right wing piles of shit ever in this country? As for the people I know and love, a good percentage of them was freaking out at home. I decided to choose just a few pieces of daily information I felt essential, switched off the rest of the panic-inducing media and focused on other stuff. I, for one, am really grateful for how things turned out for my family and me.

We provide high quality, cost-effective ut austin essay help across a wide variety of industries in both the private and public sector. What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

First it seemed like house streaming and people doing stuff live on Facebook were the answer. I stand with what Nick Cave said about them in early April, I think most of that stuff is plain self-indulgence. Live music is mostly a social thing, there’s no way a surrogate experience can ever avoid being boring and feel adulterated. I have written tons of music for almost all of my projects, worked on commercial tunes for advertisement, home demoed 90 percent of a future Sixcircles album did a lot of stuff that I always wanted to focus on and I have been waking up each morning wanting to do more and go to places I hadn’t been musically before. You know, Moody Blues once said thinking is the best way to travel. For what concerns the broader music community, I know many people in the live music world that are struggling to survive and some drive-in gig isn’t simply enough to change things. I can only wish for a speedy twist in the plot for people dealing with this.

Order a much needed writing service to work on one of your how to research paper writers assignments. 14-5-2007 ˇ Train your kids to do homework without arguing! What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

A disproportionate event such as the one we’re all going through now offers a whole array of free lessons to be learned. Biggest one is that all things must pass. Inhabitants of the privileged sector of the planet are now familiar with a redefined concept of “personal restriction” to some extent. Covid has pulled the best and worst out of everyone and hung a huge question mark over our heads. Franco Maresco, a Sicilian director whose art I admire, has recently said in an interview that mankind won’t learn much from the pandemics, just like many times before. I partly share this vision and feel like covid is a portion of a bigger dysfunctional picture anyway. I’m essentially hoping for best and preparing for worst. I can say I felt nauseauted by the trendy optimist logorrhoea that flooded the Italian web when everybody started writing, painting, drawing the phrase “ce la faremo” (“we will make it”) on whatever available surface. After all, Turgenev once stated that there are situations, however touching, from which one nevertheless wants to escape… as for Assumption, the band is made of people I love. We will simply carry on and do our stuff whenever it’s possible again.

https://www.facebook.com/assumptiondoom/
https://assumption.bandcamp.com/
https://www.instagram.com/assumption_band/
https://www.facebook.com/sixcirclesband/
https://phonosphera.bandcamp.com/album/sixcircles-new-belief/
https://www.facebook.com/ElevatorstotheGratefulSky/
https://elevatorstothegratefulsky.bandcamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/doloremeanspain/
https://dolore1.bandcamp.com/

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Days of Rona: Jose Maldonado of 3 Wheeler Band

Posted in Features on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

3 wheeler band jose maldonado

Days of Rona: Jose Maldonado of 3 Wheeler Band (Monterrey, Mexico)

Looking for professional personal narrative essay to buy? CDP offers high quality SEO content and article writing services at affordable prices with unlimited How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

As a band we have been really close using video calls and social media to connect, uploading some old tracks on Bandcamp and recently went back to rehearsal but only 2 of us, so it’s kind of hard right now to be all 3 of us in the same room jammin’ some tunes.

As an individual, I’ve been taking care of my Family, staying in touch with Friends and Family via video calls and I’m very fortunate to be able to work from home, so just trying to keep my mind busy.

On band plans, this coming August we are going to turn 10 years as a band and we were planning the anniversary gig and this covid crap hit us hard, so that’s on standby right now but we have uploaded music to our Bandcamp and are talking about making a video. Regarding the creative process this lockdown has helped us in working on some riffs for new tracks so we have been busy doing that. We try to stay positive about all of this and eager to get back on stage and have a good time.

Feeling trapped while writing an essay? MyAssignmenthelp.com is the one that not only promises but also provides top-quality online http://cheapessaywritings24.com/help-me-write-essay/ help me write essay How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

I live in Monterrey, Mexico, an industrial city northeast of the country (a two-hour drive from Texas). At first people were kind of freaking out and being really afraid of the virus and nobody was going out for anything except groceries and basics. Now, two and a half months later, people are tired of staying indoors, local government closed the Heineken brewery which makes, of course, Heineken but also Tecate beer and the people just freaked out, panic beer shopping until we ran out of beer. The brewery remains closed and currently there is no beer in the city and folks are just losing it. Besides, local and federal government communications are not clear and people are starting to go out a bit more. We hear similar stuff happening in Texas, so we are taking care of each other but we had enough of the lock down really.

Affordable prices for read thiss in Australia Assignment helps provide report writing services in Sydney, Australia for university students. What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

The local music scene has responded great by doing a lot of online collaboration through videos and creating songs from the distance so yeah, the local scene has been busy, very creative and active on social media. And inspired? Yes, we and other band friends have been doing our homework, my side band Artesano de Piedra also uploaded unreleased tracks to Bandcamp, members of 3 Wheeler Band, Moonwatcher and Tres Cabrones created a new acoustic venture named Moon Dweller Trio and some other friends are taking advantage of the time they have on their hands to be creative. So we’re good, we all will come back stronger.

http://www.nuotohydros.net/can-i-pay-for-someone-do-my-homework/ Close. Provides custom writing, ebook writers for a ghost writer services - best essay. When they seams to browse these What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

As a band 3 Wheeler Band will continue to work on new riffs and turn them into new tracks, we will be busy doing that and staying in touch with Friends/Fans and placing some CDs out for distribution in the States, so stay tuned for that.

Regarding our situation as a City and Country, we basically are not doing that bad regarding the virus, some government agencies are tricking numbers and giving out fake info. If you have Friends and Family in Mexico reach out to them and ask them directly, do not fall for the info shown in the media, they are just creating panic and fear.

Personally, just take care of you and yours. Do not lose touch with Friends, use technology to connect with them and don’t fall for the news in the media. Try to stay positive as much as you can. We will get through this and heavy music and live music will be back stronger than ever. And if you are enjoying some cold beer send some our way! Salud!

https://www.facebook.com/3WheelerBand/
https://www.instagram.com/3wheelerband/
https://3wheelerband.bandcamp.com/

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Sorge Stream Self-Titled EP in Full

Posted in audiObelisk, Reviews on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

SORGE (Photo by Matt Carter)

Washington D.C. newcomers If you tagged us, “please Homepage online” then we take it seriously and do your project efficiently within no time as well as low price. Sorge are set to self-release their self-titled debut EP on Friday, and when it comes right to it, one of the most exciting aspects of the 27-minute four-tracker is how settled it isn’t. From the Our gallery of over 500+ free business plan look for a business plan that’s for a business that operates of Your custom thesis proposal Danzig-ian wails, theatrical synth and rolling sludge riffs of opener “Faith of a Heretic” onward, the five-piece troupe seem to actively work to defy the conventions of microgenre, instead honing a sound that is both aggressive and thoughtful, but without the pretense inherent in so much prog-tinged modern heavy. “Faith of a Heretic” and “A Horse in Turin,” as well as the low-end-distortion highlight “Argent” and the driving finisher “Astral Burnout” are all marked by plotted guitar leads that underscore the band’s surprising level of self-awareness in terms of their methodology — this is not a group haphazardly tossing elements together and seeing what sticks — and the complexity of the progressions surrounding those solos, instrumentally and vocally, draws from an array of sources. It’s not a shock to learn there are multiple creative forces in the band, or that they have some measure of variety in their own personal tastes, but find this UK is Best, As We Serve You Through Highly Qualified and Experienced Writers With Free of Plagiarism And Top Quality Cheap Essay Sorge‘s Writing a conclusion for kids - top 10 resume writing services technical cv writing service To An Essay literary analysis essay on 1984 dissertation student room Sorge makes all the more of an impression because of their refusal to let anything dominate their sound so much as their individualist impulses and concurrent tonal heft.

Two guitars — Joshua Gerras (also vocals) and Logan Boucher (leads) — plus http://rahimbakhshighschool.edu.bd/chemical-engineer-phd-resume/ at 100% Best Custom Essay Writing Service. Buying Papers Online of Top quality only Christian Pandtle on bass, You apparently do know how spending nights trying to craft a perfect research paper feels. Have rest and let our http://sovetsky.info/?sex-ed-essay do it for you. Jake Filderman on synth and 10 Reasons to Use zoology homework help Writing Service: You will receive the highest quality custom paper that will surely help you out when you need it. Mike Romadka on drums, and as they push into “A Horse in Turin” they sound like some futuristic vision of traditionalist doom, not quite catchy, but not quite not-memorable either, and the wash they bring to bear in the song’s midsection isn’t to be missed, either for its flourish of drama or the Sorge sorgesheer depth of its mix, solidifying around a lumbering riff before bursting forth once more, this time shifting into all-out blastbeating as though to further demonstrate their lack of constriction. “Argent” and “Astral Burnout” are shorter (the EP runs longes-to-shortest), but not my much, and the unbridled atmosphere of the first two cuts continues to hold sway across the churning severity surrounding the crashes late in the proceedings, squibbly soloing seeming to wink at more extreme metal even as laserz-yes-with-a-‘z’ synth accompany. More pummel awaits in “Astral Burnout,” but there’s a hint of melodic fluidity to come there as well — “Faith of a Heretic” had it too, for that matter — that speaks to the angle of growth Sorge might be looking to undertake over the longer term. If they’re the kind of band who are going to look to tour when/if such things are possible, they’ll likely get there that much faster.

They’re young, or at least young-ish, and sound it. There’s patience to be learned in their craft, but in the meantime, I’ll happily take the swinging finish of “Astral Burnout” and the overarching groove that seems to draw the different pieces of the song together into one entirety. Again, Sorge‘s first release isn’t one that finds them declaring outright the rigid parameters of their sound, but rather, the place from which their scope will spread outward, and already they have a significant breadth at their disposal. As to which direction their work might ultimately take, I won’t hazard a guess onto to feel silly later, but for what it’s worth, they show an impressive level of command in their songwriting for a band both new and stylistically varied, and their forward potential only makes this EP more exciting to hear in the present.

You’ll find the four tracks streaming in their entirety below, followed by comment from the band.

Please enjoy:

Sorge on Self-Titled EP:

We’re rather proud of this as our debut release. It took us a little bit to find our feet together and start playing shows, but we all were friends before this so it was a blast playing together. The patience certainly paid off as our collective nerves couldn’t handle bombing a show. Best to practice in a smokey basement for two years, huh?

These songs were written collaboratively during that time, thus allowing us all to infuse our individual inspirations. Josh comes from more of a punk background, where I’ve always been into extreme metal. I also make electronic music as a solo artist, as does Jake. Logan was into shredding and technical stuff in high school. Heavy music was Mike’s first love, but he’s also dabbled in more genres than we can list. I find this interesting because it has been an eventful few years, all of us have changed as people throughout our writing and recording process. These songs, especially Faith of a Heretic and a Horse in Turin, are thus time capsule of sorts, capturing our collective feelings and imaginations from the time. We wanted to draw from our diverse influences while making fucking heavy music and are pleased enough with the results. We’re all our worst critics and when you’ve been drilling and writing for a few years it’s easy for those narratives to become the dominant ones in your head. We’ve been blown away by the initial reception and are so appreciative that people are getting what we’re putting down.

Recording the EP was a real trip. We’re pretty DIY but after self recording/mixing a two song demo we realized that we’re serious enough to be working with professionals. Mike and I were frankly kinda shocked when Kevin from Developing Nations got back to us, some of our favorite albums of the last few years were recorded there (e.g. Ilsa’s Corpse Fortress and Outer Heaven’s Realms of Eternal Decay). That being said, recording is expensive and we’re a bunch of young dudes so we ended up recording the whole thing in four days over two weekends without a click. Most stuff had to get done in one or two takes. That experience really solidified what we had already been screaming at each other for years: don’t waste a moment of your audience’s attention. We’ve written a ton since then and are extremely keen to get back on the road and in the studio when it’s safe to do so.

Joshua and I come from a background in western philosophy and were feeling adrift and depressed when we started this project. We kinda just started writing riffs together and before long had brought Mike, Logan, and Jake into the fold. I think we all realized on some level that doing something creative as a group is better than doing nothing at all and we were able to use that insight along with constant self-criticism to create something that we hope is more than the sum of its parts. We wanted to capture the urgency of living, that sense of restlessness that lives even in the most peaceful of hearts.

We’re at an interesting point in history and we couldn’t not express the low key, yet productive, angst that typifies our generation. We and especially those younger were born atomized and are conditioned to believe it’s the only way to live. Much our initial work into Sorge was driven by a need to prove to ourselves that disconnection is not the only way of living. Sorge is a German word meaning “care, or concern” and can refer to that fundamental concern we have for all beings, and thus for ourselves.

SORGE will independently release Sorge digitally on Friday, June 5th, with a physical release to follow. Find digital preorders at Bandcamp HERE.

SORGE:
Christian Pandtle – bass
Joshua Gerras – guitars, vocals
Mike Romadka – drums
Logan Boucher – lead guitars
Jake Filderman – synths

Sorge on Thee Facebooks

Sorge on Instagram

Sorge on Bandcamp

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Review & Lyric Video Premiere: Pale Divine, Consequence of Time

Posted in Bootleg Theater, Reviews on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Pale Divine Consequence of Time

[Click play above to see the premiere of Pale Divine’s lyric video for ‘Saints of Fire.’ Consequence of Time is out June 26 and available to preorder from Cruz Del Sur: CD preorder, LP preorder w/ poster & download, digital release June 19.]

Even among American traditionalist doom — which as a whole is underrated — there aren’t many who reach the same echelons in that regard as Pale Divine. Also their debut release for Cruz Del Sur Music, Consequence of Time is their sixth full-length, and as it arrives just two years after 2018’s self-titled LP (review here), it also marks the quickest time differential the Chesapeake-region group — Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware — have ever had between two offerings. Pale Divine, the record, was notable for marking the first appearance of Ron “Fezz” McGinnis on bass and backing vocals, who brought the five-string acumen he’d demonstrated in Admiral Browning and countless others to the classic-style rolling riffs and searing leads of guitarist Greg Diener (also vocals) and the ever-steady, never-flashy, always-efficient drumming of Darin McCloskey. On the eight-song/42-minute Consequence of Time, there is another significant change in the band’s makeup.

Even as they were releasing the self-titled, Pale Divine announced the addition of Dana Ortt on guitar and vocals alongside Diener, a shift that was essentially a merging between Pale Divine and the Ortt-led Beelzefuzz, in which Diener and McCloskey had both been members. The end result is that between Diener, Ortt and McGinnis, Pale Divine now have three vocalists capable of carrying a song on their own, whether it’s Diener‘s metal-tinged proclamations, Ortt‘s bizarro-prog otherworldliness, complemented by his nuance of guitar tone, or McGinnis with his lower register bluesy take. Unsurprisingly, Consequence of Time is easily the most diverse album Pale Divine have ever made, and perhaps also the richest in terms of its general approach, since the influences especially of its two guitarists are readily on display, whether it’s in the Beelzefuzzian chug and dreamstate lumber of “Phantasmagoria” or in Diener‘s veritable clinic on how to shred a solo and still give a sense of soul in the process.

It bears underscoring just how significant of a turn Consequence of Time is for Pale Divine. The band mark their 25th anniversary in 2020, having begun with McCloskey and Diener in 1995 before releasing their first demo a couple years later. It seems to me not just a marked change in terms of the band’s sound that welcoming Ortt has enacted, but a genuinely admirable openness on the part of Diener. Yes, there’s “sharing the spotlight,” as much as such a thing exists in a genre where one might be inclined in the first sentence of a review to point out how underrated it is, but more than that, to have the ability after some 20 years of having the band as a vehicle for his songwriting to be able to adjust the entire process in such a way is staggering.

pale divine

Ortt doesn’t just sing backup on Consequence of Time, and he makes a mark in terms of the overall style of riffs and tones as well on songs like “Broken Martyr,” “Satan in Starlight,” and even the Diener-led opener “Tyrants/Pawns (Easy Prey).” It’s a rare band and a rare player who would allow that kind of shift to take place at any point, let alone after 20 years, and Pale Divine are unquestionably stronger for it. The patience in the 10-minute unfolding of the 10-minute title-track alone is proof of the subtle level on which the change can be felt, a melding of purpose between what Beelzefuzz were by their finish and the roots-doom mindset that Pale Divine have always portrayed so well.

Perhaps it’s sharing vocal duties that has allowed Diener‘s guitar to shine all the more, but his leads soar throughout Consequence of Time in striking fashion, and with McGinnis‘ bass and McCloskey‘s drums behind, there’s never any risk of the band losing their trajectory whatsoever. As the title-track approaches the halfway mark, Diener and Ortt share vocals against a stark and largely quiet backdrop ahead of the next classic metal lead (it might be Ortt‘s, I can’t be sure), but that moment sums up the incredible, throw-the-doors-open spirit of Consequence of Time. Ortt takes the fore later, and Diener rejoins and the two guitars lock purposes in solos and riffs to close out, but in that moment, not only the change of the band’s sound, but the creative spirit that drove that change are palpable. The risk and the reward both are right there for the listener to absorb.

The subsequent closing pair “No Escape” and “Saints of Fire” would seem to be an epilogue of sorts, or at least a movement unto themselves after the title-track, but their purpose isn’t lost for existing in the shadow of the 10-minute cut preceding. In the speedy “No Escape,” Diener fronts, and they trade for “Saints of Fire,” and it’s a last-minute showcase of the multifaceted nature of who Pale Divine are in 2020 and what they can accomplish as a group in this new form. “No Escape” gallops in brash form and is probably the most fun I’ve ever heard Pale Divine have on a record, and “Saints of Fire” pushes in its second half into a quirky dark gorgeousness that feels like pure inheritance from Beelzefuzz put to righteous use. Pale Divine, the power-trio turned four-piece after 20-some years, march their way out of Consequence of Time and into an unknowable future as a stronger, more versatile and more vibrant unit.

The band they were is still very much present in their sound, and they remain as sonically committed to doom as they’ve ever been, but the foundation of influence has expanded and their craft is all the more affecting and progressive for it. Between the quick turnaround, the new label and the new construction, Pale Divine move into their second quarter-century with an almost impossible feeling of potential, and one can only look forward to what they might yet accomplish as they move on from here. 25 years on and reaching new heights. That is a special band, and yes, vastly underrated. They may stay that way and they may not, but one way or the other, Consequence of Time will stand as one of 2020’s foremost offerings in doom, and deservedly so.

Pale Divine on Thee Facebooks

Pale Divine website

Cruz del Sur Music website

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The River Announce Violet Violent Sine Waves EP out Friday

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

This Friday, June 5, Bandcamp is doing another fee-waiving event where bands will take in the entirety of the money on their releases. This will be the third time it’s happened, and already last time, we saw bands putting out special releases and things like that in order to take advantage. As time and pandemic-lockdowns proceed, more bands have more recordings — can’t play shows, gotta do something — and so we see London’s The River with a quick turnaround from their 2019 long-player, Vessels into White Tides (review here), with the new EP, Violet Violent Sine Waves, which, indeed, was tracked during lockdown.

It’ll be name-your-price, but if there was ever an occasion to throw the band a few pounds, it’s the waived-fee day. I haven’t heard the release yet, but it’s got one new songs and it seems like three others from the last record redone in some quieter fashion — acoustics? pianos? who knows. Either way, this is a direct example of something that probably wouldn’t be coming out in the form it is without the occasion Bandcamp are sponsoring, so consider the interplay between patronage and creativity right there as you sit and consider the price you’ll name. Support matters.

Here’s the info I have:

the river violet violent sine waves

The River – New EP

A companion piece of sorts to 2019’s critically acclaimed ‘Vessels Into White Tides’, ‘Violet Violent Sine Waves’ was recorded in lockdown, March-May 2020, during the global Coronavirus Pandemic. Comprising three songs reworked from the aforementioned album, as well as a brand new composition, the music has been painted in subtler & softer tones, showcasing a maturity to the band’s songwriting & craft whilst retaining the integrity of the original recordings.

‘Violet Violent Sine Waves’ will be released on June 5th 2020 as a pay-what-you-want download from the band’s Bandcamp site & will be streaming across all the usual sites within due course.

Line-up
Jenny Newton – Guitars, Vocals, Strings, Percussion
Christian Leitch – Guitars, Percussion
Stephen Morrissey – Bass
Jason Ludwig – Drums

facebook.com/riverbanduk
riverbanduk.bandcamp.com/
instagram.com/_riverbanduk/
https://open.spotify.com/album/5sWZYcfQ9FgaLxkSJAleQ0
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYGlhUlzveouAu6byo6j6TQ

The River, “Vessels” official video

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Greenmachine’s D.A.M.N. Reissue out June 19

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 3rd, 2020 by JJ Koczan

greenmachine

With label representation in Japan, Europe, Taiwan and the US, it seems safe to say there’s a consortium standing behind this June 19 reissue of Greenmanchine‘s 1996 debut album, D.A.M.N., and reasonably so. The Japan-based troupe were raw beyond their years a quarter-century ago and D.A.M.N. still offers enough scathe to well earn its cult following in noise and sludge rock. The band had a new album out last year called Mountains of Madness, and I didn’t get to hear it, but their reunion has been going on for a while now on and off, and both this record and its follow-up, The Earth Beater, which was also issued on Man’s Ruin Records, stand the test of time. Some bite never relents.

So yes, here’s news from Robustfellow Productions, Long Legs Long Arms, Riff Merchant Records and Bad Moon Rising. The more the merrier, I guess:

greenmachine damn

Greenmachine’s Sludge Classic “D.A.M.N.” To Be Released On Vinyl For The First Time Ever

Robust Relics Series is back with the reissue of the pure sludge masterpiece!

Please welcome Greenmachine from Japan.

Their debut album “D.A.M.N.” was released 24 years ago by local label TASTE Recs. [T/CD-1] in 1996.

Two years later it was released by the US cult label Man’s Ruin [MR103CD], with cover artwork designed by graphic artist/label owner Frank Kozik. That artwork still looks shocking and disturbing even today!

In 2003 Japan’s DIWPHALANX [PX-103] added “+3” to the title and re-released this beast once again. This Japanese re-issue is very difficult to find.

In 2020 Robustfellow invited two fine labels: Riff Merchant and Long Legs Long Arms to cover the globe with analogue sludgecore tunes, starting with “D.A.M.N.”

This is the first release of this album on vinyl in 24 years.

Biography:

Greenmachine named themselves after the Kyuss song “Green Machine,” the second track on Blues for the Red Sun. In 1996 they released their debut album, D.A.M.N. on TASTE Recs., reissued by Man’s Ruin Records. They followed with The Earth Beater two years later, also on Man’s Ruin. They disbanded in 1999 but resurfaced in 2003 with a new bass player and released The Archives of Rotten Blues in 2004 on Diwphalanx Records. Diwphalanx also reissued the two Man’s Ruin albums with bonus tracks in 2003. They played The Wizard’s Convention in 2005 and are featured on the DVD along with fellow Japanese artists Boris, Church of Misery and Eternal Elysium.

The band disbanded again in 2007, with the DVD release, “This is the End”, documenting their final show. The band has since done multiple reunion shows. The first was in 2010, the second in 2013. The line up for that show was MONZAWA on guitar/vocal, HASEGAWA on bass and DATSU on drums. After the 2013 reunion show, the band reunited again with MONZAWA on guitar/vocal, YOSHIKAWA on bass and DATSU on drums. The band recruited a new member, Max, on guitar in 2014 and released “FOR THE NIGHT AND BLOOD EP”(Daymare Recordings) in 2016. New full-length “Mountains of Madness” was released in 2019 via Long Legs Long Arms & Daymare Records.

Greenmachine Links:
https://www.facebook.com/GREENMACHiNE.Hardcorerock/
https://www.instagram.com/_grmc_/

Robustfellow links:
https://www.facebook.com/RobustfellowProds
https://www.instagram.com/robustfellow_prods
http://www.robustfellow.bandcamp.com

Long Legs Long Arms links:
https://www.facebook.com/3LAdisc/
https://www.instagram.com/3la_disc/
https://longlegslongarms.bandcamp.com/

Riff Merchant Records links:
https://www.riffmerchant.com/
https://www.instagram.com/riffmerchantrecords/

Bad Moon Rising links:
https://badmoonrisingtaipei.com/
https://www.facebook.com/BadMoonRisingTaipei/
https://www.instagram.com/bad_moon_rising_taipei/D.A.M.N
https://badmoonrising.bandcamp.com/

Greenmachine, D.A.M.N.

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Days of Rona: Bill Kole of Ol’ Time Moonshine

Posted in Features on June 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

The ongoing nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, the varied responses of publics and governments worldwide, and the disruption to lives and livelihoods has reached a scale that is unprecedented. Whatever the month or the month after or the future itself brings, more than one generation will bear the mark of having lived through this time, and art, artists, and those who provide the support system to help uphold them have all been affected.

In continuing the Days of Rona feature, it remains pivotal to give a varied human perspective on these events and these responses. It is important to remind ourselves that whether someone is devastated or untouched, sick or well, we are all thinking, feeling people with lives we want to live again, whatever renewed shape they might take from this point onward. We all have to embrace a new normal. What will that be and how will we get there?

Thanks to all who participate. To read all the Days of Rona coverage, click here. — JJ Koczan

ol time moonshine bill kole

Days of Rona: Bill Kole of Ol’ Time Moonshine (Toronto, Canada)

How have you been you dealing with this crisis as a band? As an individual? What effect has it had on your plans or creative processes?

Ol’ Time Moonshine was in the studio laying down drums and bass for our new record at the beginning of March when the reports of the virus started to become more frequent. It wasn’t long before the shelter in place/quarantine orders came down. It’s now been a bit more than 10 weeks since we’ve all been in the same room playing together. We’ve been working on our parts for the record and taking care of some band business and promotion, including uploading our releases to streaming services after more limited release. The uncertainty of what the musical landscape will look like when this is all over has been weighing a bit heavily – a number of venues in our province have already shut down permanently since the pandemic began, and a lot more are close. Even when they open up, the capacity restrictions are likely to devastate their businesses. As a band we’re just taking everyday and doing what we can; looking after all the little projects we always said we’d do if we ever had time. The plan right now is to get back and start tracking guitars and vocals in June, which was our original target for completing the record. We’re lucky to live in an era of connected technology that can keep us together and informed if we choose to use it that way.

I’m blessed to work for a wonderful, family owned film audio support business that has kept me on payroll, even when the office was shut, and we’ve reached a point where I’m able to come in to the office safely, mostly working alone, for a few hours a few days a week. It helps break up the monotony of the days, and I’ve been walking the few kilometres to work to avoid public transit and get some exercise. It’s been wonderful to see my family pull together and be strong in the face of this, and to have friends and family making masks for one another, shopping for those less mobile, trying to make the kids in the neighbourhood feel special on their birthdays, etc. I finally was able to teach my daughter the basics of riding her bike after several seasons of trying, and we’ve done lots of work on our apartment to freshen it up. I’ve been working on a few album covers and posters in my free time (and a lot of revisions on posters due to shows moving). I’ve tried to keep getting up at the same time everyday and keeping somewhat of a schedule so that the days don’t just fade away into one another. Motivation has its good days and bad days, but I try not to be hard on myself. I’ve found my emotions bubble closer to the surface; joy and sadness bring me to tears pretty quickly these days. Trying to look at the positives each day and stay strong for my family and friends.

How do you feel about the public response to the outbreak where you are? From the government response to the people around you, what have you seen and heard from others?

I generally feel that the federal and provincial and municipal governments have done a decent job of looking after their people in this crisis, though there is always room for improvement and some communities have been more affected than others. Unfortunately, a few have felt that the rules they make do not apply to them. We’re seeing that in a lot of places, though, not just Canada. I fear that a lot of restaurants, theatres, venues and other cultural institutions may not weather this storm without further intervention. It will certainly be interesting to see what survives and thrives on the other side of this unprecedented economic disaster. On a personal level, most of my friends and family have remained rational and followed precaution. I’m proud of them. I am particularly proud of my friends and family in health care and food service that have sacrificed so much to ensure our safety and wellbeing. I haven’t had anyone close to me pass from COVID-19 complications, but I do have several friends and family members that have lost loved ones. It’s probably too late and too difficult for most, but I feel a stricter lockdown, sooner, would have been more effective then and less painful now. We’re a bit too eager to get back to “normal” and I fear that opening up too soon will undo the progress we’ve made. We just loosened a few restrictions last week, and already people are getting lax about wearing masks and distancing. As someone with asthma and autoimmune issues I need to be a bit extra cautious, and it can be disheartening to see someone not wearing a mask in an enclosed space like a store, or just as bad, wearing it as a chin strap or taking it off to lean over a protective barrier and speak to them.

What do you think of how the music community specifically has responded? How do you feel during this time? Are you inspired? Discouraged? Bored? Any and all of it?

I think most of the people in my musical circle have adapted well, but miss being able to see each other and hang out at shows. I’ve watched a number of great live streams, and some cool pro-shot shows are coming online soon. It’s not entirely the same without the atmosphere and immersion, but it’s the best we’ve got for the moment. I’ve had more time to listen to music, so I’ve been diving in and doing a lot of deep listening, catching a lot of great records I missed the first time around. There have been some great articles and discussions in the scene, and it’s been fun to see what a lot of my fellow musicians have been listening to. I’ve talked to a few groups of musicians about contributing guitar or vocals to a few different projects outside of OTM. I’m really proud of the record Ol’ Time Moonshine is working on, and I REALLY want to get it finished and out there. We’ve gone through a lot these past few years since the release of “The Apocalypse Trilogies”, so it has been a bitter pill to swallow to see us get all of our game pieces in order just for the game to change, but we’ll adapt and move forward, we always do. It could have been much worse, though, so I’m grateful we haven’t lost more. So many friends have had to cancel their release parties and tours. So many promoters and touring companies have lost their livelihood for the perceivable future. So many recovering addicts and people with mental health issues have lost their support. If you are having a good, positive day and feel you can handle it, please, reach out to someone you know who might not be and let them know they have someone that loves them.

What is the one thing you want people to know about your situation, either as a band, or personally, or anything? What is your new normal? What have you learned from this experience, about yourself, your band, or anything?

I don’t think things can possibly go back to the way they were. It’s all going to be a bit different, and take some getting used to. I think some have found they are stronger than expected, and some are not as strong as they thought. We need to be compassionate and help one another, especially those that fall through the cracks, and we need to take better care of our mental health. We need to be kinder, and more honest with ourselves and loved ones. I miss my US and worldwide doom family, and hope the borders open back up soon and that everyone stays safe so we can enjoy live music again soon.

https://www.facebook.com/oltimemoonshine/
https://oltimemoonshine.bandcamp.com/
http://www.oltimemoonshine.com/

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Valkyrie Announce Fear LP out July 24

Posted in Whathaveyou on June 1st, 2020 by JJ Koczan

Valkyrie

I had a moment of genuine surprise realizing that it has been five years since Harrisonburg, Virginia’s Valkyrie released their last LP, Shadows (review here). That was also their first album for Relapse Records — the forthcoming Fear will be their second when it arrives on July 24 — and if half a decade seems like a long time between records, you’re not wrong, but for Valkyrie, it’s actually an increase in frequency. It was seven years between 08’s Man of Two Visions (discussed here) and its follow-up. So it goes when one of your founding guitarists splits his time between this and Baroness.

Nonetheless, Fear will most likely see Valkyrie past the 20-year mark, which they’ll hit in 2022, so there’s something to be said there even if the band has never really been full-time. When a new Valkyrie comes around though, it’s not to be missed.

They’re streaming the opening track now, and here’s PR wire info:

Valkyrie Fear

VALKYRIE: Announce 4th Full-Length Album Fear Coming July 24th

Share New Song “Feeling so Low”

Virginia heavy rockers VALKYRIE return with their anthemic, riff-driven new album, Fear, coming July 24th! Their first new album in 5 years, Fear finds VALKYRIE sounding more progressive and diverse than ever before.

Fear is due out July 24th on CD/LP/Digital. Physical packages are available for pre-order via Relapse.com HERE. Digital Downloads / Streaming Services are available HERE.

Recorded at Earth Analog in Illinois, Fear showcases the tone-rich, organic songwriting process VALKYRIE has honed in on over the course of their career. A warm analog sound permeates each of the album’s 8 tracks, as blistering twin leads, soaring guitar harmonies by Pete and Jake Adams, poignant lyrics, and a relentless rhythm section results in a highly textured and timeless collection of heavy rock. With Fear, VALKYRIE takes the next step in their evolution as one of the most creative and dynamic forces in the hard rock scene today. Tracks such as “Feeling so Low,” “The Choice,” and “Evil Eye” showcase VALKYRIE expanding their sound, infusing their take on classic hard rock with a penchant for remarkable melodies and creative hooks.

Photo Credit: Savo

Fear Tracklist:
Feeling so Low
Afraid to Live
Loveblind
The Choice
Fear and Sacrifice
Brings you Down
Evil Eye
Exasperator

VALKYRIE Is:
Jake Adams – Guitar/Vocals
Pete Adams – Guitar/Vocals
Alan Fary – Bass Guitar
Warren Hawkins – Drums/Percussion

https://www.facebook.com/thevalkyrierides
https://www.instagram.com/valkyrie_va/
http://thevalkyrierides.bandcamp.com/
http://www.relapse.com/valkyrie/

Valkyrie, “Feeling So Low”

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